Is College Degree The Only Way To Land A Lucrative Job?

In the past few years, many Irish individuals were prevented from getting lucrative jobs due to prejudice. Most of us are used to the tales of job notices saying “No Irish need apply.” But the fact remains that such prejudice still exists today and is preventing numerous Irish educated people to apply for jobs. Currently, there is a common attitude across Ireland, which is rather ill-informed, that considers a university degree as the only way to land a lucrative job. Moreover, vocational training and apprenticeships are considered to be a poor quality alternative.

Demand For Vocational Skills

Vocational Training

Image source:bit.ly/1WQDvtK

The truth is, presently there is a rapidly increasing demand for individuals with vocational skills. For instance, around 48,000 workers are now employed in the logistics industry, and in the coming 5 years an additional 13,500 to 15,500 people will be added as the sector will expand. The level of skills required to work in the logistics sector is expanding. Today we need advanced computer management systems along with cutting edge automated warehouses to keep the work going, which is necessitating a high demand for trained & skilled staff.

Damien English, Minister of State for Skills, Research and Innovation, recently wrote in an article “Ireland now has one of the highest proportions of people with a third-level degree in the EU. According to Eurostat, more than half of 30 to 34 year old (51.1 per cent) in Ireland have completed third level compared to a European average of 35.8 per cent of 30- to 34-year-old who had completed tertiary education. The third-level system and the graduates it produces have been key to our economic success.”

Emerging Challenging

Knowledge And Skills

Image source:bit.ly/1Rxc0T7

But, now problems are starting to come up with the existing system. The excess focus on university is preventing numerous youths from acquiring salable knowledge and skills that will enable them to build successful careers. Rather, these young people are being motivated to pursue courses that are not suitable for them or their future careers.

English added “One result is that on average 15 per cent of students drop out after first year (22 per cent from ITs, 9 per cent from universities and 4 per cent from teacher-training colleges). This is a waste both of the students’ time, and taxpayers’ and parents’ money.”

Workers Are Overqualified

A new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) found that more than 42 per cent of workers in Ireland are employed in a field which is not suitable for their qualification. The figure is much more than the OECD average. Moreover, more than 50 per cent of these people are identified as overqualified for the positions they are employed in. According to the report, it has been estimated that this mismatch of qualifications and jobs cost the economy around €1.5 billion.

Education Degree

Image source:bit.ly/1G1GZW6

Damien English wrote “We have a very good education system but there are significant gaps in how we build skills in Ireland. Academic ability is not the only valuable talent and not every profession is best learnt in an academic setting. Business needs people with strong practical skills, and apprenticeships and vocational training are key to delivering these.”

He added “We need to recalibrate the third-level educational system to focus more on learning by doing and on-the-job training if we are to address these issues. ”

What do you think? Share your own opinions and thoughts with us by commenting below. We would love to hear from you.

Article source – bit.ly/1OoJbK2

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s